Why Is An Anemia Blood Test Given To A Person?

Spread the love

One of the most apparent of all reasons that a doctor does issue an anemia blood test to a patient is very obvious. It is because this medical professional believes that his or her patient may, very well be anemic, and they have to prove it via a proper diagnosis.

Being anemic is a very serious medical condition and can be something that can even threaten a person’s life if it is not caught in time. Therefore, it is crucial to get a proper diagnosis, and part of doing this is by having a blood test for anemia being done right away.

What is Anemia?

Anemia is a word that is derived from an ancient Greek word that stands for lack of blood. It is a medical condition that occurs from there being a serious reduction in the overall number of red blood cells or a deduction in the normal amount of hemoglobin that is present in the blood.

There can also be a serious lack of oxygen-binding activity for each hemoglobin molecule due to some type of deformity or lessening of numerical development that are seen in cases of hemoglobin deficiency. Hemoglobin which can be found in red blood cells is responsible for carrying oxygen from the area of the lungs to the capillaries.

However, having anemia can trigger off hypoxia, and hypoxia is a shortage of vital oxygen being delivered to vital organs that need the oxygen. Every human cell in the body is dependent on oxygen for survival and having different degrees of anemia can cause a wide range of varying consequences if oxygen is not delivered normally to the cells.

Anemia is a very common disorder of the blood, and the different kinds of anemia that take place, are something that can be attributed directly to various underlying causes. Nonetheless, there are three main types of anemia, and these types of anemia are major blood loss called hemorrhage, massive blood cell destruction called hemolysis, and a lessening of red blood cell production called ineffective hematopoiesis.

Anemia is also a disease that can go virtually undetected in some patients and this is because symptoms can range greatly from being minor to vague in description. The reasons for the symptoms being what they are specifically can be due to the type of anemia itself or the underlying cause for it.

Some of the most common symptoms of anemia are fatigue, weakness, general uneasiness, lack of concentration, and even shortness of breath in some cases. If anemia get to be severe, it can effect the heart, and sufferers can experience palpitations, angina, claudication, and symptoms of heart failure.

If a doctor strongly suspects that a patient potentially has anemia. He or she will issue an anemia blood test and this blood test for anemia can be one of several tests. One of these tests is a complete blood count.

What is a complete blood count test?

A complete blood test is called a CBC for short, but it is also called a full blood count FBC, or a full blood exam FBE. This complete blood test is a test panel that is ordered by a physician or other medical professional for a patient. This test is designed specifically to deliver information about the cells in a patient’s blood. It is either a scientist or lab technician who is in charge of doing the test and for delivering the results of it directly to the physician or medical professional that ordered it in the first place.

Additional tests may be ordered upon diagnosis of anemia being made

Once a confirmed diagnosis has been made via the results of a anemia blood test. A doctor may, very well decide to order that other tests to be made by the patient. This is because there is usually another underlying cause for the development of anemia in the first place.

These underlying causes do need to be determined and they may include anything from iron deficiency anemia developing from a chronic condition of bleeding ulcers to colon cancer to benign polyps in the colon to kidney failure to other tumors being present. Therefore, a blood test for anemia may just be the beginning, and other tests will soon follow if an underlying cause does exist.

Related posts: